Deaths from breast cancer set to rise

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Worldwide deaths from advanced breast cancer are predicted to rise 43% to 805,000 by 2030.

Out of the 3,000 diagnosed with breast cancer in New Zealand each year, over 600 will die from advanced breast cancer. Advanced breast cancer is stage four breast cancer, where the cancer has spread from the breast to other parts of the body.

A recent global report highlights the significant lack of attention and resources given to the advanced breast cancer community. The report emphasises the need for greater patient and family focused resources for those living with advanced breast cancer.

The Global Status of Advanced/Metastatic Breast Cancer 2005-2015 Decade Report identified emotional support and quality of life improvements are the top two patient needs.

A key recommendation from the report is to focus on the factors that impact quality of life and effective psychosocial interventions to maximise quality of life in patients.

In New Zealand, Sweet Louise is the only national charity solely dedicated to supporting New Zealanders living with advanced breast cancer.

Sweet Louise CEO Fiona Hatton says “This comprehensive research confirms what our Sweet Louise Members have been saying for the past 10 years – there is not enough funding nor attention given to advanced breast cancer”.

Hatton says an advanced breast cancer diagnosis has a devastating impact on members, their family and friends.

“As an organisation, we provide emotional and practical support for our Members living with advanced breast cancer and their families. There is no cure for this disease, no way to prevent it and early detection does not alter the outcome- this is a terminal diagnosis.  We want to raise awareness for the hundreds of women and men dying each year from breast cancer in this country”.

 

About The Global Status of Advanced/Metastatic Breast Cancer 2005-2015 Decade Report

The Global Status of Advanced/Metastatic Breast Cancer 2005-2015 Decade Report is an analysis of the advanced breast cancer landscape looking at more than 14,000 adults in 14 countries. For a summary of the report, click here.

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